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John Deere Right to Repair

For decades farmers hired independent mechanics to fix and maintain their tractors and farm equipment. Farmers now claim that their right to repair has been severely restricted by John Deere because crucial software and repair tools have been made inaccessible to them and independent repair shops. This policy has reportedly given farmers no other choice than to take their equipment to John Deere dealerships for repairs, which often carry significantly higher costs.

If you paid for repairs on Deere tractors or combines that contain engine control units (ECUs) from a Deere dealership or a Deere technician from January 12, 2018, to the present, you may have a claim. To explore your legal options, fill out the short form above or call 800.755.0098.

 

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John Deere ECU Background

In the early 2000s, John Deere began to sell tractors, combines, and other agricultural equipment with integrated onboard computers know as ECUs. These components require specialized software and tools, forcing farmers to rely solely on dealerships for maintenance and repairs. Farmers claim this monopoly has increased the costs of repairs significantly. It has been reported that a minor repair requiring only 3 minutes of work, can cost the owner more than $600.

 

John Deere Right to Repair in the News

1.22.2022: Alabama Farmer Sues John Deere for ‘Right to Repair’, al.com

1.12.2022: John Deere accused of monopolizing tractor repair industry in antitrust suit, courthousenews.com

 

How We Can Help

If you paid for repairs on Deere tractors or combines that contain engine control units (ECUs) from a Deere dealership or a Deere technician from January 12, 2018, to the present, you may have a claim. To explore your legal options, fill out the short form above or call 800.755.0098.

Zimmerman Reed has experience representing farmers and more than 30 years of experience in holding companies accountable and we want to help you.